Pulitika2010

Everything you've wanted to know about RP politics, but were afraid to ask.

Opinions in the Phil. Star

Posted by akosistella on April 23, 2010


    Share

EDITORIAL – The right connections

Meritocracy, the rule of law, transparency — you name it, President Arroyo has set it back during her long years in power. Malacañang spokesmen say that poor government employees deserve representation in the board of the Home Development Mutual Fund or Pag-IBIG Fund. If this nation is ever going to improve its competitiveness instead of turning into Asia’s basket case, something should be added to that noble explanation for the appointment of the President’s manicurist, Anita Carpon, to the Pag-IBIG Fund, and her gardener Armando Macapagal to the Luneta Administration: poor government employees can be promoted, why not, but only if they deserve it. This is called merit, and it has nothing to do with regular contact with the President’s ingrown toenails and fingernails.

via Phil. Star

People more pessimistic about life
DEMAND AND SUPPLY By Boo Chanco

Election season is normally fiesta time. People are happy because candidates and their supporters have rediscovered their importance. Money is being spent on colorful rallies, food and other goodies are being distributed and money in general changing hands for precious votes. The economy receives a stimulating boost as wealth is redistributed to the bottom part of the population who quickly spend the largesse for their basic needs.

Elections also used to offer hope of better days ahead. Candidates offer solutions to age old problems and for a brief moment transport many of our people to a much better place. Six years ago, Pulse Asia recorded only a 22 percent pessimism rate among our people. Today, it has gone up to 35 percent.

via Boo Chanco.

Defer Ampatuan trial, or bring case to UN
GOTCHA By Jarius Bondoc

Gloria Arroyo had better think twice about fixing the massacre case against her Ampatuan political pals. She might end up co-accused — before the International Criminal Court no less.

Formed in 2002, the UN body tries cases of genocide, war crimes, and atrocities against humanity. As a rule, it takes on cases if, in obvious cover-up, a government refuses to mete justice.

via Phil. Star

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: